Five Must-See Masonry Buildings in Toronto


John Robert D. General, RN, MSN

Built to last a lifetime, five well-loved masonry heritage buildings have been singled out as the most beautiful hot spots in the Greater Toronto Area. They stand as sturdy tributes to the craftsmanship of the past and are now praised for great work and wonderful historical significance.

They've been part of Toronto's cityscape for over a century and their appeal doesn't only sprout from their architectural design, but also from the materials used to build them. It is safe to note therefore that the building blocks they have utilized have laid a very good foundation on how these buildings stood impeccable to the test of time.

Five Toronto landmarks have helped define the city's character “Diversity in Unity”, and became a beacon of how great works in the past could be strong instruments to define the city’s present living and future ideals. With Toronto’s rich history of beautiful and enduring buildings, it’s no surprise that most of the iconic and architecturally significant buildings in the city were built with brick, block or stone. Such a magnificent epitome of how masonry has molded today’s architectural paradigm.

So now, you may want to work on those internet-powered laptops and search on these landmarks. These were chosen based on durability, aesthetic appeal, community contribution, and the best use of masonry products in their architectural blueprint. Topping the list is The Gladstone Hotel.

Built in 1889 at 1214 Queen Street West, this Toronto landmark has been entertaining the city and its visitors for over 100 years. The rough cut stone and brick give the building its iconic image, situated on the corner of Queen Street West and Gladstone Avenue. Throughout changes in neighborhood and lifestyles, and decades of growth and re-growth.

The Gladstone has remained an iconic and aesthetically pleasing building throughout its history, enhancing the community and adding enduring style to Toronto’s cityscape. So on your next summer trip, try exploring The Gladstone Hotel. They can be simply reached at +1 416-531-4635 ‎or visit their website at gladstonehotel.com. Check out the google map link at https://maps.google.com.ph/maps?hl=en&tab=wl .

The second best place to visit may be your next favorite as this is conspicuous to everyone. Noticeably present in Toronto for several decades, the Old City Hall has been one truly structure that amazes tourists and the like.

Officially opened in 1899, Old City Hall at 60 Queen Street West was designed by famed architect, E.J. Lennox, who was commissioned by the city to build a durable structure of stone. Old City Hall was constructed with permanence and aesthetics in mind. Accordingly, Lennox designed the building with the exterior in rock-faced sandstone, the ground level constructed of heavy courses of stone, and masonry above the roof line. As a symbol of people’s deeds and aspirations, the Old City Hall is still standing and impressive today. It has fulfilled its original intention as a durable structure that would impress visitors with the importance of Toronto for decades to come.

It may be a phone call away with this contact number +1 416-338-0338 or its website at www.toronto.ca/old_cityhall/‎. You may also want to verify and check out the google map link at https://maps.google.com.ph/maps?hl=en&tab=wl .

Getting in to the main district is not absolutely complete without paying a fun trip to The Distillery District. This is the third building or area ranked as fabulous masonry artwork.

A National Historical Site, the Distillery District is one of the best examples of the industrial sector’s use of masonry building products that stand the test of time. Beginning in 1832, the Distillery District sprung from the ground with its Victorian industrial architecture, ideal for the District because of its form and function. Today, the District’s enduring buildings have been designated as the largest and best preserved collection of Victorian Industrial Architecture in North America.

Its brick and stone streets and multitude of red brick buildings showcase the strength and versatility of masonry products. The enduring beauty of the material has prompted a revitalization of the area into “an unbelievably important treasure.” It is considered as one of the best and well-preserved Toronto scenic spots.

Before venturing there, you can try to take a peek of its full-depth details by browsing through their website at http://www.thedistillerydistrict.com/ or grab that phone and contact +1 416-364-1177. Also please feel free to browse through and check out the google map link at https://maps.google.com.ph/maps?hl=en&tab=wl . I hope this truly helps.

Are you excited to see the fourth on the list? It is The Gooderham Building. It is Toronto’s most iconic vistas and historic landmark. The Gooderham Building is also known as the Flat Iron Building at 49 Wellington Street East. Built in 1892 on the eastern edge of the city’s Financial District, this building has housed both commercial and office space over the past century.

The red brick building, designed in Romanesque and Gothic revival style was built for George Gooderham, former president of the Bank of Toronto and owner of Gooderham and Worts Distillery. The narrow wedge-shaped building highlights how masonry products can be used to create such unique architectural style.

Its details is very well included in the website www.toronto.ca or you can simply check out https://maps.google.com.ph/maps?hl=en&tab=wl for more information. The contact number to reach is +1 416-392-1975.

Casa Loma completes the five “Must-See” Masonry Buildings in Toronto. Toronto’s iconic castle, and certainly one of Canada’s most impressive buildings, Casa Loma on Austin Terrace was built in 1911-1914by Sir Henry Mill Pellatt as a setting where he could play host to royalty.

Considered as the largest house ever built in Canada, Casa Loma boasts white cast-stone battlements, chimneys and towers, and an impressive skyline that runs at Austin Terrace Road. Since 1937 Casa Loma has been run by the Kiwanis Club and is one of the most popular tourist sites in Canada. Its Gothic Revival style depicted in stone ensures its place as part of Toronto’s cultural heritage.

Its contact number is +1 416-923-1171 or you can certainly check the website at www.casaloma.org/‎. Do not forget to also try browsing https://maps.google.com.ph/maps?hl=en&tab=wl for contact information.

So thinking of going around Toronto for the most fascinating scenic attractions? Masonry buildings like the five listed above are a “must-see” for you. They do not only offer breath-taking and captivating view of their beautiful artworks and architectural designs but also prove that masonry products are pieces of evidence of Toronto’s great past and history.

Buildings constructed with masonry products stand testament to the history and durability of brick, block and stone. These buildings are perfect examples of why masonry products make the ideal building material. Not only do they look marvelously incredible, but they will continue to enhance neighborhoods for centuries to come.